1. Welcome to SportsJournalists.com, a friendly forum for discussing all things sports and journalism.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register for a free account to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Access to private conversations with other members.
    • Fewer ads.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon!

They may be dribblin', but they ain't learnin'.

Discussion in 'Sports and News' started by shotglass, Oct 15, 2008.

  1. shotglass

    shotglass Guest

    NCAA president Myles Brand says he sees progress in the latest numbers for graduating athletes.

    I think he's putting a dress on a piglet.

    and

    It reads like graduating more than 50 percent of your student-athletes is a noble goal. If it is, that's a pretty sad statement.
     
  2. So, I guess they're giving the football team a school they can be proud of, huh?
     
  3. Matt1735

    Matt1735 Well-Known Member

    50 percent may not be the goal... however.....

    According to the following weblink, only 51 percent of students who enroll in college graduate within five years of entry date. I understand that the NCAA is using a six-year calendar, but that's not a huge difference from the regular student body.

    http://www.act.org/news/releases/2002/11-15-02.html

    Asking student-athletes to be that much better than the general population is asking too much.
     
  4. shotglass

    shotglass Guest

    Indeed a good point, Matt.

    But here's something else. The student-athletes are the ones who have academic advisors and supervisors dedicated solely toward getting them on top of their work. The general student body can't say that they are monitored with the same zeal.

    The general thought for a non-athlete is, "It's on you. If you want an education, it's there. If you don't, your loss."
     
  5. Matt1735

    Matt1735 Well-Known Member

    Found some better data, from the NCAA itself:

    • 63 percent of Division I student-athletes who began college as freshmen in 2000 graduated within six years, compared to 62 percent of students at Division I institutions, according to the federal data.

    http://www2.ncaa.org/portal/academics_and_athletes/education_and_research/academic_reform/grad_rate/2007/d1_key_findings.html
     
  6. ink-stained wretch

    ink-stained wretch Active Member

    Apples vs. oranges

    Federal methodology, I believe, automatically classifies a student who transfers to another school as a nongraduate
     
  7. shotglass

    shotglass Guest

    Apples vs. oranges, but the methodology of reporting isn't making up for the fact that maybe 40% of these kids are walking away with nothing academically to show for it.
     
  8. D-3 Fan

    D-3 Fan Active Member

    What? The Big 10 is absolved from scrutiny? The horror! The horror!!
     
  9. Baron Scicluna

    Baron Scicluna Well-Known Member

    True, although for many of them, they have to miss classes to attend games, and need the help. Of course, that doesn't address the issue of scheduling games with long distances on weekends instead of during the week. After all, ESPN needs its programming.
     
  10. SoCalDude

    SoCalDude Active Member

    How many of the non-grads are millionaires now??
     
  11. True, although for many of them, they have to miss classes to attend games, and need the help. Of course, that doesn't address the issue of scheduling games with long distances on weekends instead of during the week. After all, ESPN needs its programming.
    [/quote]

    How about students who are ill and aren't granted the same long-term help, i.e., personal tutors, even though they miss class at comparable rates? Many students need the help---and they're not given free rides to begin with. Please don't make it seem as if student-athletes are victims or aren't given enough help?
     
  12. shotglass

    shotglass Guest

    A very small percentage of them, sir. That's the fallacy; everyone thinks all these guys are signing huge pro contracts.

    If you're averaging 9 points a game in the Big East, you aren't getting ready for the NBA. If you're lucky, you're playing two years in Lithuania, and then getting on with your life, such as it is.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page