1. Welcome to SportsJournalists.com, a friendly forum for discussing all things sports and journalism.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register for a free account to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Access to private conversations with other members.
    • Fewer ads.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon!

Redundancy

Discussion in 'Journalism topics only' started by mike311gd, Sep 5, 2006.

  1. mike311gd

    mike311gd Active Member

    Now, this makes me mad. It seems that whenever I write a gamer and give it to the editor, he makes his changes. For the most part, the changes are all right. But, this one bothers me, and it happens often:

    Before changes: “Smith drove a double to the gap, clearing the bases to tie that game at 3.”

    After changes: “Smith drove a double to the gap, clearing the bases to tie the game at 3-3.”

    This is a habitual change, which bothers me quite a bit. I know I’m a young writer, but I’ve got four years of sports writing and about 18 years of reading, writing and understanding of the English language.

    A side-note: I hate abbreviations in my articles. In AP articles, you never see “Mussina led NY to a win…” Why is it then fair game to change my writing to “Jones shut down NY after six innings.”?

    Maybe this is something most young writers go through. Any thoughts?
     
  2. Hank_Scorpio

    Hank_Scorpio Active Member

    Please forward this post to the Department of Redundancy Department forthwith.

    Thank you.

    The Management.
     
  3. Ace

    Ace Well-Known Member

    Mike,

    That may be a style rule at the paper. Don't loose sleep over that.

    If I edited that sentence, I would have done this:

    “Smith doubled to (right-center?), driving in (three?) runs to tie the (score, not game), 3-3.
     
  4. Claws for Concern

    Claws for Concern Active Member

    That's why you're the Ace. Good editing that truly gives the reader what really happened.
     
  5. zeke12

    zeke12 Guest

    Now, this makes me mad. It seems that whenever I write a gamer and give it to the editor, he makes his changes. For the most part, the changes are all right. But, this one bothers me, and it happens often:

    Before changes: “Smith drove a double to the gap, clearing the bases to tie that game at 3.”

    After changes: “Smith drove a double to the gap, clearing the bases to tie the game at 3-3.”

    This is a habitual change, which bothers me quite a bit. I know I’m a young writer, but I’ve got four years of sports writing and about 18 years of reading, writing and understanding of the English language.

    A side-note: I hate abbreviations in my articles. In AP articles, you never see “Mussina led NY to a win…” Why is it then fair game to change my writing to “Jones shut down NY after six innings.”?

    Maybe this is something most young writers go through. Any thoughts?
     
  6. Bob Cook

    Bob Cook Active Member

    Hawk Harrelson would have written: "Smith smacked a two-bagger with the bases juiced, putting up a crooked number on the board for the good guys to knot the score at 3 apiece!"
     
  7. Leo Mazzone

    Leo Mazzone Member

    Now, this makes me mad. A newb comes in here and makes his changes. For the most part, the changes are all right. But, this one bothers me, and it happens often:

    Before changes: “Smith drove a double to the gap, clearing the bases to tie that game at 3.”

    After changes: “Smith drove a double to the gap, clearing the bases to tie the game at 3-3.”

    This is a habitual change, which bothers me quite a bit. I know I’m a young writer, but I’ve got four years of sports writing and about 18 years of reading, writing and understanding of the English language.

    A side-note: I hate abbreviations in my articles. In AP articles, you never see “Mussina led NY to a win…” Why is it then fair game to change my writing to “Jones shut down NY after six innings.”?

    Maybe this is something most young writers go through. Any thoughts?
     
  8. TwoGloves

    TwoGloves Active Member

    I'll get back to you at 12 noon.
     
  9. jgmacg

    jgmacg Guest

    Now, this makes me mad. A newb comes in here and makes his changes. For the most part, the changes are all right. But, this one bothers me, and it happens often:

    Before changes: “Smith drove a double to the gap, clearing the bases to tie that game at 3.”

    After changes: “Smith drove a double to the gap, clearing the bases to tie the game at 3-3.”

    This is a habitual change, which bothers me quite a bit. I know I’m a young writer, but I’ve got four years of sports writing and about 18 years of reading, writing and understanding of the English language.

    A side-note: I hate abbreviations in my articles. In AP articles, you never see “Mussina led NY to a win…” Why is it then fair game to change my writing to “Jones shut down NY after six innings.”?

    Maybe this is something most young writers go through. Any thoughts?
     
  10. Double J

    Double J Active Member

    I think this whole issue is something that should be addressed at the next Associated Press Sports Editors of the Associated Press convention.

    Furthermore, it should be brought up the next time the Associated Press Sports Editors of the Associated Press get together.
     
  11. He needs it by 10 a.m. in the morning.
     
  12. blondebomber

    blondebomber Member

    Tying the game, 3-3, is just as redundant as tying the score at 3-3.

    The play in question tied the game at 3.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page