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Covering the SUPER BOWL

Discussion in 'Sports and News' started by sportsnut, Jan 31, 2007.

  1. sportsnut

    sportsnut Member

    So some of you may be in Miami right now working on doing some coverage of the Super Bowl.
    But I have heard and even read about the game that some reporters are placed in a room with tv's and they don't actually get to watch the game live.

    If you have to watch it on tv why even bother sending someone if you can just watch the game at home? Then we have media day, again NFL Network is providing us with a live feed and again why go to Miami if you can all of this info live on tv and from NFL's online media room?

    Give me your comments regarding this issue please.
     
  2. WSKY

    WSKY Member

    watching TV in Miami is much nicer than at home
     
  3. ballparkman

    ballparkman New Member

    I covered the AFC Championship game in Indianapolis and was not even in the RCA Dome. There were about 50-60 reporters in the Convention Center, which is connected to the RCA Dome. We had all the press notes, books, etc., and we had food available. However, we had to watch the game on TV.
    I was surprised so few writers were complaining, but that changed as soon as the game began. The press box narrator and the on-field official both were piped into the room, and the TV was on about a 7-second delay. So, when Peyton Manning was under center, you would hear the press box guy say, "Pass incomplete." Sort of took the suspense out of watching the game.
    The one thing I'll never forget was after the first play when it was apparent that it was going to suck. He said, "Just when you thought it couldn't get any worse."
    The good news about the Super Bowl is I doubt that will happen. The championship games are played at home, thus season-ticket holders get tons of seats and there are fewer left for press overflow.
    For the Super Bowl that's not the case. I was in Detroit last year and sat in an upper-deck seat with a table and a television in front of me. I expect the same this week in Miami.
     
  4. BYH

    BYH Active Member

    I'm pretty sure the NFL and most media companies would like nothing better than if writers covered the Super Bowl from the NFL Network.
     
  5. outofplace

    outofplace Well-Known Member

    sportsnut, please read that post by BYH. You should find it educational.
     
  6. 85bears

    85bears Member

    Because we're reporters, not stenographers.
     
  7. slappy4428

    slappy4428 Active Member

    Nothin better than listening to Rich Eisen
     
  8. BTExpress

    BTExpress Well-Known Member

    That's true.

    But the only event that has a lower ratio of reporters:stories broken than the Super Bowl is a political convention.

    With the tiniest of exceptions, Super Bowl is nothing more than a media perk, an "I worked my butt off all year and this is my reward" assignment.
     
  9. Lugnuts

    Lugnuts Well-Known Member

    Welcome to the world of covering major sports. It's not just the Super Bowl.

    See also: SportsJournalists.com threads about credentialing bloggers.

    P.S. The dirty little secret is that many sportswriters prefer to watch games on TV to make sure they don't miss anything.
     
  10. Welcome to the world of covering major sports. It's not just the Super Bowl.

    See also: SportsJournalists.com threads about credentialing bloggers.

    P.S. The dirty little secret is that many sportswriters prefer to watch games on TV to make sure they don't miss anything.
    [/quote]

    Amen and amen. Sometimes, being in the press box can be a drag. More than once I've had my boss (who is watching on a TV at home/work) call me during a game and say "TV is saying so and so is out 3 weeks" because the sideline reporter had it, while we in the press box had no idea because we're stuck with the press box announcer's monotone.
     
  11. Screwball

    Screwball Member

    Honestly, this is not a perk assignment once you get there. Way too many media, not enough players, horrible access, led like sheep by NFL handlers ... that's not to say that a week of sunshine in January and catching up with out-of-town friends in the business is a bad thing. But I covered Super Bowl once and pray I never have to do it again.
     
  12. sportsnut

    sportsnut Member

    Thanks for all of the great information. I can see that some people love the Super Bowl and some hate it. I was asking because the closest I have ever gotten is Arena football.

    I hope to myself possibly next year be able to go to Arizona for Super Bowl 42 and just want to know what to look forward to.

    Any suggestions on how to cover a big game like the Super Bow? Specially if you only have a photographer and a reporter instead of a huge team like some publications?
     
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