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Why do you like or dislike blogs/bloggers?

Discussion in 'Journalism topics only' started by eyeonsportsmedia, Dec 18, 2007.

  1. No, this question is not an invitation for flames ;D. I am currently writing a guest column for a trade publication on the tension between Sportswriters and blogs/bloggers. I am asking for your thoughtful, cuss-free, reasons why you dislike or like blogs/bloggers. If you would like to respond, could you address the following questions? Keep in mind that with 3 exceptions, I have no idea who any of you all are in real life so this will be anonymous unless you choose to disclose (which you can do by sending me an email).

    So here goes:

    1. Are you a beat writer, columnist, both, or other? if other, please indicate your role in sports journalism)
    2. What is your definition of a journalist? How do you react to/define the term "Citizen Journalist"?
    3. What is your definition of a blog?
    4. Do you have a blog on your employer's web site? If so, how is your blog different than other sports blogs?
    5. What do you see the difference between a newspaper column and a blog posting?
    6. If a blog is written by former sportswriters, is your opinion about the blog different?
    7. What is your age range? 18-30, 31-40, 40-50, 50+
    8. Do you feel professionally (or personally) threatened by sports blogs?
    9. Do you think bloggers should have the same legal protections as journalists? Why or why not?
    9. Is what you do relevant in the Internet Age? (this one actually comes from a friend who is going to ask a restaurant critic this question over dinner tonight)
    10. If you could have a one on one session with your most liked/disliked blogger, what advice or critique would you give them (and feel free to name the blogs here)?
    11. Should bloggers be given press credentials for events, and if so under what circumstances/rules?

    I will be sending similar questions to the people running sports blogs as well.

    Just for disclosure sake, I have run a business process controls blog since July 2004. I have also written occasional business columns for the Athens Banner-Herald, articles for technical/business magazines, and am on the editorial advisory board of a business magazine. I also speak to groups and organizations about blogging risks (see my article "Managing the Business Risk of Blogs"). I include this stuff not for my ego (my wife does a very good job of puncturing that), but to let you know I am starting this as a serious thread and hope that you all can contribute to the conversation.

    Added: Oh, and forgot, I have, as a blogger, had my own run-in with a "Journalist" at Forbes by the name of Dan Lyons. See "Who Does QA Work on Forbes Magazine Writers?" and "On Why I Responded to A Forbes Interview Request". So I will try an leave my built-in biases out of it ;D .

    And the first person that starts a response with "BLOGGERS!" or "BLOGS!" will have to mediate a counseling session between Alycia Lane and Suzy Shuster! Oh wait, chances are you all would enjoy that :p .

    Thanks for your thoughtful participation.

    Christopher Byrne
    Eye on Sports Media
     
  2. Oggiedoggie

    Oggiedoggie Well-Known Member

    If you are writing a column for a publication, aren't you supposed to have your own ideas instead of repackaging the ideas of others?
     
  3. OD --
    Give him something of a break. He's trying to do a little research here.
     
  4. I have my own ideas, but I also would like to include perspectives from both sides...I think Fox calls it "Fair and Balanced" ;-) ?
     
  5. Bad example.
     
  6. Oggiedoggie

    Oggiedoggie Well-Known Member

    Hence, one of the complaints:

    Blogs are often shallow and pass unscientific surveys off as research, just as some pass unattributed speculation and opinion off at "journalism."
     
  7. Now that is a thoughtful response...backed up by examples.

    I never said that this is intended as a scientific survey. In fact it is not a survey document at all. I am simply trying to get feedback from the sports journalism community to include in the overall piece, which is for a trade publication. If I wanted to do a scientific survey, I would have hired someone lke John Zogby.

    Why don't you wait until you pass judgment?
     
  8. I forgot to highlight it in blue to show the sarcasm. ;)
     
  9. sportsnut

    sportsnut Member

    Here you go...... Since nobody else want to do it.

    1. Are you a beat writer, columnist, both, or other? I am a sports writer/NFL columnist.

    2. What is your definition of a journalist? How do you react to/define the term "Citizen Journalist"?
    A journalist is someone that gets paid to cover his/her team or sport. A sports journalist or any other journalist for that matter has sources and have built trust with his/her readers though the newspaper.

    3. What is your definition of a blog?
    A blog is a great way for graduates to get there hands a little dirty while writing opinion articles on what they enjoy. Very few blogs can be considered professional with a backing of a company i.e. deadspin and Gawker Media.

    4. Do you have a blog on your employer's web site? If so, how is your blog different than other sports blogs? Yes I blog because sometimes I am able to write more about what I actually mean in a blog then in my original column, but that is changing right now as my employer wants more opinion in my column.

    5. What do you see the difference between a newspaper column and a blog posting?
    Like I said above a newspaper and website column has the backing normally of a bigger media company that can handle the heat that my column may bring. A blog 90% of the time is a free website. i.e. pantersfootball.wordpress.com.

    6. If a blog is written by former sportswriters, is your opinion about the blog different?
    Yes because its now written my a professional who will still use his sources to get the right information instead of posting rumors and Deadspin.com reports articles.

    7. What is your age range? 18-30, 31-40, 40-50, 50+
    18-30

    8. Do you feel professionally (or personally) threatened by sports blogs?
    No, a sports blog gives fans and even the team a new way to figure out exactly what the fans think about what they are doing.

    9. Do you think bloggers should have the same legal protections as journalists? Why or why not?
    No they should not because they are not journalists. If a 17 year old boy wrote a fake story on a blog he should not be able to use the rights of a journalist and the press because he is not a journalist or a member of a press agency/organization.

    9. Is what you do relevant in the Internet Age? (this one actually comes from a friend who is going to ask a restaurant critic this question over dinner tonight)

    writers are needed in magazines, newspapers, websites, TV, radio etc. So yeah what I do will always be relevant.

    10. If you could have a one on one session with your most liked/disliked blogger, what advice or critique would you give them (and feel free to name the blogs here)?
    I actually love deadspin and the biglead and believe they are not reporting or calling themself reporters. They don't go to games and request credentials because they know they don't need them. Both blogs are available to talk about sports and what kind of effect this may have on the general public. Both blogs are highways for real opinion and analysis without the pressure of a big media company.

    11. Should bloggers be given press credentials for events, and if so under what circumstances/rules?
    No they should not be given credentials to live games but I don't see the harm in giving them access to press conferences etc as long as they act professional and don't ask really stupid questions and just take what the print guys give them because they may learn something.
     
  10. Thanks SportsNut...I cannot say that I totally agree with your reply to #3, because it makes a jump that a sole proprietor cannot have a professional blog without the backing of a company...
     
  11. Walter Burns

    Walter Burns Member

    1. Are you a beat writer, columnist, both, or other? I'm a sports editor.
    2. What is your definition of a journalist? How do you react to/define the term "Citizen Journalist"? My definition of a journalist is someone who gathers facts and reports and/or analyzes them. My definition of a blogger is someone who might report facts, but more often, offers commentary on issues of the day. The phrase "Citizen Journalist" makes my skin crawl, because at my house, it amounts to "we're cutting staff and relying on submitted articles and pictures to keep local content up without spending money."
    3. What is your definition of a blog? An online journal of news/commentary/whatever, based on the writer's biases and agendas.
    4. Do you have a blog on your employer's web site? If so, how is your blog different than other sports blogs? N/A
    5. What do you see the difference between a newspaper column and a blog posting? A newspaper column usually has a set length, while a blog posting does not. A blog posting can be very similar to a newspaper column, but more often, it's a little more scattershot.
    6. If a blog is written by former sportswriters, is your opinion about the blog different? Yes, because I know that they have training similar to mine.
    7. What is your age range? 18-30
    8. Do you feel professionally (or personally) threatened by sports blogs? I do not. They do some things the same as us, but when people have to choose (to give a small example) between a blog that doesn't know the difference between "they're" and "their" and a newspaper put together by people paid to do it, I think they'll choose us. Additionally, blogs synthesize information, usually gathered by someone at a newspaper.
    9. Do you think bloggers should have the same legal protections as journalists? Why or why not? Not particularly, and that's probably my own bias. I don't want someone who's writing for his or her own edification as an amateur to declare themselves journalists when they screw up and need help.
    9. Is what you do relevant in the Internet Age? (this one actually comes from a friend who is going to ask a restaurant critic this question over dinner tonight) Yes. There will always be a demand for people who can gather information and then put it together so it makes sense. And besides, most blogs (at least the ones I read) don't do their own investigating, relying on information gathered by the local newspaper.
    10. If you could have a one on one session with your most liked/disliked blogger, what advice or critique would you give them (and feel free to name the blogs here)? I plead the Fifth
    11. Should bloggers be given press credentials for events, and if so under what circumstances/rules? If the blogger is from a legitimate news organization, I have no problems with it. But that's the team and league's decision to make.
     
  12. fishwrapper

    fishwrapper Active Member

    So, I can't cuss?
     
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