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Popular Science ends reader comments

Discussion in 'Journalism topics only' started by Rusty Shackleford, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. Rusty Shackleford

    Rusty Shackleford Active Member

    I'm in favor of this, for exactly the reasons stated. The internet caters to the mental lowest-common-denominators of humanity's lowest-common-denominators. Ending the BS discussions of scientific stories is fine by me, and I applaud this move:

    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/popular-science-ends-reader-comments--says-practice-is-bad-for-science-002245622.html
     
  2. LongTimeListener

    LongTimeListener Well-Known Member

    But pageviews! Racists buy timeshares too.

    Good move. I look forward to the Internet constitutional scholars/scientists explaining why Popular Science is just afraid of real discussion.
     
  3. Glad Poynter chimed in. How is Poynter still relevant these days?
     
  4. lantaur

    lantaur Active Member

    A counter point:
    http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2013/09/25/popular_science_says_comments_bad_for_science_shuts_them_off_bad_move.html
     
  5. H.L. Mencken

    H.L. Mencken Member

    Why Slate sucks my taint, by Slate. #slatepitches
     
  6. Starman

    Starman Well-Known Member

    Any article related to space exploration in any way is guaranteed to get moon-landing-conspiracy comments within the first dozen or so posts.
     
  7. HejiraHenry

    HejiraHenry Well-Known Member

    The line about "(eroding) the popular consensus on a wide variety of scientifically validated topics." made me uneasy.

    There was, for instance, a strong popular consensus in the scientific community for a long time about eugenics. Now, not so much.
     
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