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More yardage questions

Discussion in 'Journalism topics only' started by TyWebb, Oct 21, 2007.

  1. TyWebb

    TyWebb Well-Known Member

    I thought I had this correct, but a fellow writer said it should be something else. I know it has been discussed here but I couldn't find the thread.

    On a hook-and-ladder, I give the passing yards to the QB and receiver from where the pitch is made and rushing yards to the guy who receives the pitch from that point. Is this correct?

    Also, on an option play, I split the rushing yards between the QB and RB depending on where the pitch is made. I've seen some people just give all of the yards to the RB. Which is correct?
     
  2. joe_schmoe

    joe_schmoe Active Member

    <<On a hook-and-ladder, I give the passing yards to the QB and receiver from where the pitch is made and rushing yards to the guy who receives the pitch from that point. Is this correct?>>

    No. second guy gets receiving yards, but no catch. All the rest is okay. QB gets all passing yards. Receiver who caugh ball get reception and yards up to point of pitch. third guy gets yard from point of pitch to however far he goes.


    On option play, same principle. If the pitch is behind line, the final runner gets all the credit. Past line, two players get credit. The player who advances the ball past the line gets credit for the carry and yards to point of where pitch is caught, second guy gets rushing yards, no rush.
     
  3. Barsuk

    Barsuk Active Member

    Correct. Same thing on a fumble that is advanced by the offense. The original ball-carrier gets a rush/reception and yardage up to the point of the fumble, and the player who advances the fumble gets yardage in the original category but no attempt/reception.
     
  4. spnited

    spnited Active Member

    hook-and-lateral, thank you.
     
  5. Sorry to hijack the thread a bit but don't want the board to be overloaded with yardage question threads.

    My Question:
    How do you stat a blocked punt. Is it lost rushing yards for the kicking team? Just curious. Had that happen twice to me this weekend, in my game and one that my stringer covered ... thanks!
     
  6. Barsuk

    Barsuk Active Member

    It's a punt for zero yards, charged to the team (rather than the individual punter) and I believe the difference in yardage from the original line of scrimmage to the point at which the defensive team takes possession goes down as return yardage, but I'll check on that.
     
  7. Barsuk

    Barsuk Active Member

    "If the ball travels toward the kicker's goal and is recovered by the blocking team, the yardage is treated as a punt return by the player who blocked the kick. If the ball travels toward the kicker's goal and is recovered by the kicking team, the yardage is treated as a punt return by the player who blocked the kick; and the blocking team is charged with a fumble lost, except on fourth down."

    For more, download the NCAA statisticians manual <a href="http://www.ncaa.org/wps/portal/!ut/p/kcxml/04_Sj9SPykssy0xPLMnMz0vM0Y_QjzKLN4j3CQXJgFjGpvqRqCKOcAFfj_zcVH1v_QD9gtzQiHJHRUUAc0tpTA!!/delta/base64xml/L3dJdyEvUUd3QndNQSEvNElVRS82XzBfTFU!?CONTENT_URL=http://www2.ncaa.org/portal/media_and_events/ncaa_publications/statistical_and_instructional/fall/football/index.html">here.</a>
     
  8. BillyT

    BillyT Active Member

    We always called it hook and ladder.

    Your terminology is certainly correct, but where I have been, hook and ladder is the name coaches use for the the play. I never really thought about it.
     
  9. TyWebb

    TyWebb Well-Known Member

    Both are correct, one in the literal sense and one in the slang sense.
     
  10. fossywriter8

    fossywriter8 Active Member

    There is no RUSHING yardage on a hook and ladder (or hook and lateral), it is all PASSING and RECEIVING.
    The quarterback gets all the yardage in passing.
    The first receiver gets credit for one (1) reception and gets RECEIVING yardage to the point where the second receiver receives the pitch.
    The second receiver is credited with zero (0) receptions on the play, but does get RECEIVING yardage from the point where he receives the pitch to where the play ends.
    Here's an example.
    Ball on Team A's 20-yard line.
    Team's A QB throws a 10-yard pass to R1; R1 pitches the ball to R2 at the 15; R2 scores a touchdown.
    The scoring line would read:
    TEAM A — R2 80 pass from QB
    However, here are the individual stats on that play.
    QB: 1 for 1 passing for 80 passing yards.
    R1: 1 reception, 5 receiving yards.
    R2: 0 receptions, 75 receiving yards.
    The scoring line has to read 80 yards because that's how far the play covered, but the individual lines will be slightly different (R2 with 75 receiving yards though the scoring play went for 80).
    We have a team in our coverage area which loves to run this play, so it makes for some interesting stats in the agate. And, yes, we actually had a kid get credit for zero catches and 75 yards in the individual receiving category. That will sure bump up the average.
    :)
     
  11. wickedwritah

    wickedwritah Guest

    And can someone refresh my memory on fumbles? Who is credited with the yards? Does it depend on the situation?
     
  12. joe_schmoe

    joe_schmoe Active Member

    On fumbles, the yards to the point of recovery is credited to who fumbled. Return yards credited from point of return.
    So if Player A takes hand off on play originating at Team A's 30 yard line, and fumbles at A35 yard line, recvoered at A40, he is credited with 10 yards, regardless of if his team recovers or opposition recovers.
    If the said fumble is advanced by another teammate, intial rusher gets yardage up to fumble recovery, and second guy gets rushing yard (but no attempt) up to point of end of his run.
     
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