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MLB clubhouse etiquette

Discussion in 'Journalism topics only' started by moonlight, Apr 2, 2007.

  1. moonlight

    moonlight Member

    Hey folks.

    I've just started my first MLB beat, and I'm kind of consfused about how we media people should act when doing interviews in the clubhouse before and after a game.

    I think if you have a player one-on-one, another reporter shouldn't butt in. But some do. I understand when there's TV cameras and microphones in the guy's face after a tough loss that it becomes a free-for-all, but what about when it's before a game and you're working on a feature on a player and you have him to yourself, then some jagoff comes over and asks a question?

    Are there any unwritten rules I should know about for this?
     
  2. Some players on certain teams have special rules and only talk at various times. But you can probably figure that out pretty quickly. And beat guys who are respectful of that will get leeway when they really need something.

    You're right about being the second guy on a one-on-one, but hovering around is sometimes the only way to make sure the dude doesn't head off to the shower or the spread. I would assume most guys aren't there to steal your answers, but just want to grab the guy next.
     
  3. HeadFirst

    HeadFirst Member

    If someone interrupts your one-on-one, you're firmly in the right to ask the second reporter, politely, if he could wait until your interview is done. Then, once you're both done talking to the player in question, you hand the guy his head.
     
  4. SnoopyBoy

    SnoopyBoy Member

    It's usually understood that prior to the games, if you're talking to a player alone in the clubhouse that no one interrupts. After the game, it's fair game. Of course, there's nothing better than a TV camera man putting his hand on your shoulder and pushing you aside to get a better shot, as if he has a better right to the position than you do. Hold your ground.
     
  5. slappy4428

    slappy4428 Active Member

    I've found an elbow in the rib cage takes care of that quickly
     
  6. Armchair_QB

    Armchair_QB Well-Known Member

    Unleashing a string of profanity that makes his tape completely useless is good too.
     
  7. casty33

    casty33 Active Member

    When I was on a beat -- granted, not for the last 14 years -- the unwritten rules were that after games, when most reporters are on deadline, there are no one-on-ones. As long as your cordial, you can cut in with a question. Berfore games, if you have a one-on-one, other reporters should honor that and stay away. If they don't, you have every right to complain to that person and to the club's PR person. Good luck.
     
  8. Shaggy

    Shaggy Guest

    My blood-stained knife also gets the point across.
     
  9. lantaur

    lantaur Active Member

    I'm not in MLB locker rooms, but I wish TV and radio guys would realize this time is not for them to ask every question. So I guess keep that in mind ... let others speak, and feel free to try to get your question in.
     
  10. Cosmo

    Cosmo Well-Known Member

    Another tip: If you know ahead of time that you'll need someone for a one-on-one, try to schedule it ahead of time. Just ask the guy the day before if you can meet with him for 10 or 15 minutes at 3:45 the next day, or whatever. The player will appreciate it. And don't count on getting a lot of pre-game work done on the first day of a series (positional meetings, etc.). Guys are tougher to pin down on those days.
     
  11. I know this sounds obvious.. but you'd be surprised: Don't sit on any furniture in the clubhouse.
     
  12. Overrated

    Overrated Guest

    Call managers "coach" when addressing them.
     
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