1. Welcome to SportsJournalists.com, a friendly forum for discussing all things sports and journalism.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register for a free account to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Access to private conversations with other members.
    • Fewer ads.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon!

Mississippi obituary goes viral

Discussion in 'Sports and News' started by Inky_Wretch, Mar 12, 2013.

  1. Inky_Wretch

    Inky_Wretch Well-Known Member

    So many highlights. My favorite ...

    He despised phonies, his 1969 Volvo (which he also loved), know-it-all Yankees, Southerners who used the words "veranda" and "porte cochere" to put on airs, eating grape leaves, Law and Order (all franchises), cats, and Martha Stewart. In reverse order. He particularly hated Day Light Saving Time, which he referred to as The Devil's Time. It is not lost on his family that he died the very day that he would have had to spring his clock forward. This can only be viewed as his final protest.

    Read more here: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/sunherald/obituary.aspx?n=harry-stamps&pid=163538353&fhid=4025##storylink=cpy

    http://www.sunherald.com/2013/03/11/4521717/best-obit-ever-tribute-written.html
     
  2. spikechiquet

    spikechiquet Well-Known Member

    That is brilliant! That's how I want to be remembered...for my life, not cliche BS.
     
  3. hondo

    hondo Well-Known Member

    Whoever wrote the obit missed their calling -- unless the old dude wrote it himself.
     
  4. heyabbott

    heyabbott Well-Known Member

    it was his daughter, the lawyer
     
  5. Starman

    Starman Well-Known Member

    "Day Light" is one word. "Daylight."

    ::) ::) ::)
     
  6. Versatile

    Versatile Active Member

    This is proof that a good eye for detail can make a typical person seem exceptional.
     
  7. trifectarich

    trifectarich Well-Known Member

    Everyone ought to have the opportunity to write obits; there you can do some true story-telling.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page