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Man avoids death penalty because jury wasn't black enough

Discussion in 'Sports and News' started by Evil ... Thy name is Orville Redenbacher!!, Apr 20, 2012.

  1. I am sure this will please the posters who oppose the death penalty to no end.

    Nevermind he's guilty.. He's get to spend the rest of his life in jail because he's black and had a jury that had only two blacks and an indian.

    Hoo-fucking-ray ... Guilt and innocence and the decision of the jury, now takes a back seat to appropriate race relations.
    How about a study on the number of educated people booted from a prospective jury pools?!

  2. Azrael

    Azrael Active Member

    "appropriate race relations"?
  3. Baron Scicluna

    Baron Scicluna Well-Known Member

    Blacks are about 12 percent of the U.S. population. Two out of 12 jurors is 16 percent (Yeah, I know, you can't chop a juror in half).

    Still, it seems the jury had enough diversity representation. Had there not been any black jurors, then I'd see a reason.
  4. Azrael

    Azrael Active Member

    What's the percentage where the trial took place?
  5. LongTimeListener

    LongTimeListener Well-Known Member

    Fayetteville is 40 percent black and 55 percent minority according to the latest census figures. Yet the jury was 75 percent white and 16 percent black, and prosecutors rejected black jurors twice as often as they rejected white jurors. Looks to me like they were specifically seeking out a heavily white jury.

    But I am sorry that you don't get to get a boner watching another man die. That must suck for you.
  6. Dick Whitman

    Dick Whitman Well-Known Member

    What a new development in American criminal law! This nation is going to the dogs! Political correctness! Whiners! Etc., etc.

  7. Dick Whitman

    Dick Whitman Well-Known Member

    Ah, yes, the lesser known Section B of the 14th Amendment, the equal protection guarantee passed in response to the systematic enslavement of "educated people."

    It's like people forget that section exists!
  8. deskslave

    deskslave Active Member

    So it doesn't bother you that perfectly qualified jurors were booted for no reason other than the color of their skin? Why do you suppose the prosecutors would want to get rid of black jurors? Why would being white be a particular qualification?

    All this overlooks the key flaw in death penalty juries: They're by definition not representative of the population at large, because opposition to the death penalty IS a disqualifier.
  9. Big Circus

    Big Circus Well-Known Member

    Sure you can. You just need a sharp enough ax.
  10. Dick Whitman

    Dick Whitman Well-Known Member

    Man avoids death penalty because jury wasn't white enough

  11. Bob Cook

    Bob Cook Active Member

  12. it bothers that it is a factor. Period.
    Justice is supposed to blind. I know that's not the real world but this ruling is just another roadblock in the system.
    Now, any ti,me the DP is applied the defense is going to add this to its arsenal of appeals. The jury was Irish-american enough. Not enough Indians, blacks, Jews, One-toed, underweight Samoans with a lisp.

    Nevermind they were tired by a jury of their peers, which rendered a verdict.
    Those verdicts - no longer guilt or innocence - can by automatically be downgraded based solely on the make up of the jury.

    It also adds another quiver for the rights of the accused ... Prosecutors won't get a second try at a conviction because a jury was too white. Too black to Jewish and they found someone innocent. That's not equal.

    I think the idea of full time jurors is a good. But this ruling is ridiculous based on the jury trial system.
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