1. Welcome to SportsJournalists.com, a friendly forum for discussing all things sports and journalism.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register for a free account to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Access to private conversations with other members.
    • Fewer ads.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon!

Leaving the business -- second thoughts

Discussion in 'Journalism topics only' started by OtterGrad, Jan 6, 2009.

  1. OtterGrad

    OtterGrad Member

    I left a big-city newspaper sports copy desk about a year ago and now work for a small bi-weekly with less pay but, for the first time in years, I have decent hours and weekends off.

    I've got to admit, though: I really miss the big city at times.

    -- I miss deadline adrenaline
    -- I miss working with talented and motivated bosses and co-workers (there are some here, but not as plentiful)
    -- I miss trying to find the perfect headline and the perfect photo
    -- I miss splashy 5-column photos with 80-pt heads for big games like the SB, WS and BCS title Game
    -- I miss the extra 35 percent of my pay

    Of course, I don't miss:
    -- those wonderful post-mortems, which are all stick and no carrot
    -- the pressure of midnight deadline
    -- getting the kids from my ex and turning them right over to the baby-sitter as I go to work
    -- the specter of looming job cuts (I'm about the only one at my shop who can lay out the paper)

    Just curious if anyone could relate or had thoughts. Thanks.
     
  2. JackReacher

    JackReacher Well-Known Member

    Ask me in a couple months, although I'm about 98 percent sure my answer will be no.
     
  3. Ace

    Ace Well-Known Member

    Ryan Sonner leaving the business is one of the signs of the Apocalypse.
     
  4. The biggest thing I'll miss about daily journalism - and it's not even close - is the camaraderie on the beat.
     
  5. Ace

    Ace Well-Known Member

    It seems to me that OtterGrad hasn't exactly left the business. Just a previous job.

    I don't miss working the night copy desk at all. But I would miss 35 percent of my paycheck.
     
  6. OtterGrad

    OtterGrad Member

    Ace:

    To a large extent, you're right. I still edit copy, put together pages and try to make deadline.

    But it's not the same because of the reasons I outlined earlier: Much less stress, better health and more family time, but also much less professional excitement. Just wondering if anybody was going through that same sort of thing (either leaving the biz or stepping down in circulation).
     
  7. Ace

    Ace Well-Known Member

    Excitement is way overrated. Especially copy desk excitement.
     
  8. JackReacher

    JackReacher Well-Known Member

    Amen.
     
  9. shockey

    shockey Active Member

    nothing beat the rush of being on a beat. i worked the desk for two years, too, and the comaraderie was terrific, but no rush at all.

    the beat life, and kinship with those "competitors," was the best. nothing like it. i certainly considered myself blessed to be part of it in a huge market during a time before the end was near for the biz i so love.
     
  10. Mizzougrad96

    Mizzougrad96 Active Member

    I miss the camaraderie more than anything.

    The excitement is overrated.
     
  11. Yeah. The best part is you're in some strange city somewhere, at a strange bar or restaurant, hundreds, maybe thousands of miles from home. But you're sitting with the only three people in the world who understand exactly what you're going through.
     
  12. Joe Williams

    Joe Williams Active Member

    Let's not romanticize this too much. It depends on the three people. Some SE somewhere dictates who goes on a beat for his paper, and sometimes that person is someone you do not care to dine or drink with, based on their tactics or personality. Sometimes that person is so fearful of being downsized that he/she always is in compete mode or just inexperienced enough to not know how to calm down. That makes a tough job tougher.

    Always have enjoyed getting to know the folks from other markets, though, covering the opposing teams.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page