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It's official: Diets don't work

Discussion in 'Anything goes' started by andyouare?, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. andyouare?

    andyouare? Guest

    This doesn't mean start going to town at all you can eat buffets, but this study says diets don't work and can damage your health long term.

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/healthnews.php?newsid=67422

    US scientists conducting a comprehensive review of dieting research have concluded that dieting does not work.

    The study is published in the April edition of American Psychologist, the journal of the American Psychological Association.

    Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), reviewed 31 long-term studies lasting between 2 to 5 years.

    UCLA associate professor of psychology and lead author of the study, Traci Mann said:

    "You can initially lose 5 to 10 percent of your weight on any number of diets, but then the weight comes back."

    "We found that the majority of people regained all the weight, plus more," she added.

    The researchers found a very small minority of study participants managed to sustain weight loss, while the majority put all the weight back on, and more in the longer term.

    "Diets do not lead to sustained weight loss or health benefits for the majority of people," said Dr Mann.

    Dr Mann and colleagues sought to determine the long term effects of dieting and address the question "Would they have been better off to not go on a diet at all?".

    So they analyzed every study they could find that followed people on diets for 2 to 5 years. Studies that take less than 2 years are "too short to show whether dieters have regained the weight they lost," they said.

    They discovered that it would have been better for most of them if they had not gone on a diet at all.

    "Their weight would be pretty much the same, and their bodies would not suffer the wear and tear from losing weight and gaining it all back," explained Dr Mann. (cut)
     
  2. lantaur

    lantaur Active Member

    Meanwhile it's reported that the sky is blue ...
     
  3. imjustagirl2

    imjustagirl2 New Member

    Diets have never worked, long-term. It's why I'm doing Weight Watchers, which isn't a diet so much as just changing the way you will eat forever.

    South Beach, Hollywood, all those? They put too much strain on the body, as said above. I'm just eating more fruits and veggies, drinking more water, getting a little bit of oil and a multivitamin every day, and eating less sugar and fat and overprocessed stuff.
     
  4. Oz

    Oz Active Member

    I don't believe in diets. But I do believe in Lean Pockets.
     
  5. One-word response: Bullshit.
     
  6. imjustagirl2

    imjustagirl2 New Member

    That line, for some reason, just made me laugh really hard. Like I picture it as a campaign slogan or something.

    i'm tired of packing and cleaning. I find amusement where I can. Thanks, Oz!
     
  7. SoSueMe

    SoSueMe Active Member

    You're right IJAG. My sister is a nurse and so is a close friend of mine. They both say, and I quote, "If people would just eat what the (old) Canada Food Guide suggests, there would be no need for diets and a lot more healthy people."

    I threw "old" in brackets because, apparently, the new one sucks. But the old one, according to all my sister's nurse and doctor friends was pretty darn good. I followed it for a month and felt great and lost some weight.

    It's a lifestyle change, not a diet that works.

    Although, I've been reading, doing and eating accodring to the Atkins diet and if you really, really work at it, you can get that diet to fall within the food guide guidelines.
     
  8. Oz

    Oz Active Member

    Anytime, I do what I can. I just figured I would tout my breakfast of champions there. ;D
     
  9. The Big Ragu

    The Big Ragu Moderator Staff Member

    I don't know a ton (pardon the pun) about weight watchers, but this sounds right to me. If the idea is to diet off weight quickly and hope to sustain it, it's a pipe dream. You need to build, good, sustainable eating habits--you'll lose weight, but it isn't quick fix stuff. It's about changing your lifestyle and sticking to it (which gets easier when you establish the good habits). Losing weight and keeping it off IS possible.
     
  10. imjustagirl2

    imjustagirl2 New Member

    Exactly, Ragu. If I do WW and lose 20 pounds, then go off it and go back to eating out all the times and getting extra cheese, I'll put the weight back on. The thing I like about WW is you don't have to cut all the good stuff out. There are enough "bonus points" mixed in during the week that I usually have one blowout meal (though I do crab legs or something high in protein) a week, or I can split that up and have a couple beers one night, a burger one night, things like that. You just have to kind of control what you eat, as opposed to starving yourself or drinking only liquids.
     
  11. TheSportsPredictor

    TheSportsPredictor Well-Known Member

    lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change lifestyle change
     
  12. Bob Cook

    Bob Cook Active Member

    Also, if there's one thing Celebrity Fit Club has taught me, people's issues with food (whether you're obese or bulimic or whatever is going on) usually run deeper than just the relationship between hand, fork and plate. That's why when you undergo bariatric surgery, you also go through pre- and post-surgery counseling: to teach how you to eat right, and to understand if there are emotional or psychological issues that are contributing to your weight.

    /By the way, new CFC, featuring Marcia Brady, coming soon!
     
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