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Do specific omissions in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

Discussion in 'Journalism topics only' started by Rumpleforeskin, Apr 16, 2008.

  1. Rumpleforeskin

    Rumpleforeskin Active Member

    Yesterday, a man died at Shea Stadium when he fell 30 feet to his death. Here are two different descriptions of his death (not graphic) from ESPN and the New York Times. Do the omissions in how he died lead to a different feel for the story and therefore take some our emotions with it?

    NYT:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/16/nyregion/16fall.html?_r=1&ref=sports&oref=slogin


    ESPN:

    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3349003
     
  2. forever_town

    forever_town Active Member

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    They look completely different to me.
     
  3. Rumpleforeskin

    Rumpleforeskin Active Member

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    True. That's why I ask. The New York Times story doesn't have the man's name, while the ESPN does and they give two different causes of death. There is also a major difference between sliding down the handrail and falling and losing your balance.
     
  4. Moderator1

    Moderator1 Moderator Staff Member

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    Where do you get 100 feet? Doesn't the Times say nearly 30?
     
  5. jgmacg

    jgmacg Guest

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    Of the two descriptions, which do you think is the more likely accident?
     
  6. PeteyPirate

    PeteyPirate Guest

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    They could both be accurate. One quotes the police and one quotes the guy's cousin, who might not want to be quoted as saying that the guy died doing something foolish.
     
  7. Rumpleforeskin

    Rumpleforeskin Active Member

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    I read a little further in the ESPN story where it said a guy fell 100 feet to his death 20 years ago.

    But corrected. Maybe you should still be in the business ;).
     
  8. playthrough

    playthrough Moderator Staff Member

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    Bingo. Cousin seems to be covering for the relative. Very noble, but the facts don't add up.
     
  9. imjustagirl

    imjustagirl Active Member

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    There's no way someone's walking down a nonmoving escalator, "loses his footing" and flips over the side and falls two floors.
     
  10. Simon_Cowbell

    Simon_Cowbell Active Member

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    I can't believe it took 10 posts for logic to come to the fore.
     
  11. imjustagirl

    imjustagirl Active Member

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    I don't think it did. I think everyone else called bullshit before. I just restated it point by point.
     
  12. ZummoSports

    ZummoSports Member

    Re: Do inaccuracies in reporting lead to a different feel for the story?

    no...at worst, he'd fall onto the steps and slide down.
     
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