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Another black eye for the newspaper industry that the end is coming

Discussion in 'Sports and News' started by boots, May 8, 2007.

  1. boots

    boots New Member

    NEW YORK (AP) — The chief marketing officer of Macy’s department stores delivered tough talk to the newspaper industry Tuesday, telling a publishing conference why her company is moving ad dollars to other media such as TV, magazines and the Internet.
    Anne MacDonald, a self-proclaimed newspaper “junkie” who keeps stacks of them around her home and reads several each day, told publishers they need to do more to win back business from Macy’s, which is part of Federated Department Stores Inc.
    With Macy’s now a national brand following Federated’s acquisition of May Department Stores, the chain is turning increasingly to media with a national reach such as fashion magazines, television and Web sites, she said.
    Newspapers are still effective at delivering local messages, she said, but need to do more to engage Macy’s shoppers — primarily women aged 18-54.
    “In order for your newspapers to be winning our advertising dollars, you need to be winning in the marketplace, and that’s not currently the case,” MacDonald said in a keynote talk at the conference held by the Newspaper Association of America.
    Analysts and investors have long been concerned about the decline in ad spending by department stores, and in particular Macy’s, as they become national brands and less likely to use local media such as newspapers. Also, newspapers have been struggling with declining circulation and ad dollars as more people get their news online.
    Among MacDonald’s several suggestions for change was for newspapers to collaborate more effectively across regions and with each other in selling advertising, which would allow national companies such as Macy’s to reach a broader audience.
    As it is, individual ad buyers for Macy’s stores deal with individual newspapers on advertising plans. “That’s not productive for either of us,” MacDonald said.
    She pointed to her own industry, department stores, which had to undergo significant changes over the past several years to adapt to competition from online stores, television shopping channels, big box retailers and discounting clubs.
    Macy’s, she said, is seeking to establish itself as a more upscale, fashionable brand and drive foot traffic even when there aren’t promotions, and is still trying to understand how customers are changing the ways they shop. “Like us, you must change the way you think,” she said.
    MacDonald pointed to the example of her two favorite sections of her hometown newspaper, The New York Times. Every week she pulls out the science and dining sections and reads them first.
    If the Times were to somehow deliver those sections to her wrapped on the outside, she would be impressed that the publisher had learned something about her reading habits, she said.
    She also issued a plea to publishers to collaborate with advertisers on research to better understand the rapidly evolving habits of their customers. The idea was immediately embraced by Jack Sweeney, publisher of the Houston Chronicle, who asked MacDonald how to find out what questions they needed answered.
    Mark Contreras, senior vice president for newspapers at E.W. Scripps Co., called MacDonald’s remarks a “very thoughtful call to action for newspapers to pay very close attention to. ... We have the wherewithal to meet many of their needs.”
     
  2. shotglass

    shotglass Guest

    Wah, wah, wah.
     
  3. imjustagirl2

    imjustagirl2 New Member

    Your thread title is the worst mixed metaphor in the history of the English language.

    Or, as you might put it, it's the straw that killed the cat.
     
  4. SoSueMe

    SoSueMe Active Member

    An advertiser calling the shots? This isn't good.
     
  5. zagoshe

    zagoshe Well-Known Member

    Oh no -- I can see it now

    Pinhead the publisher issues an edict that every story has at least one female aged 18 to 54 as a source.........Oh wait a minute, Gannett already does that :-\
     
  6. boots

    boots New Member

    Look GET OFF MY BACK KID. WHAT IN THE FUCK IS YOUR PROBLEM? YOU CAN SEND SIMPLE SIMON SHIT LIKE THIS IN A PM.
    I TRY TO IGNORE YOUR TROLLISM BUT ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!
    STAY ON THE GODDAMN TOPIC AND KEEP YOUR BULLSHIT IN A PM.
    I sincerely hope you will adhere to this.
    thanks
    boots
     
  7. SoSueMe

    SoSueMe Active Member

    At my paper, sports went from section front six days a week to only twice - to make room for the cooking/food fronts we run the other four. It's to entice the females.
     
  8. Ace

    Ace Well-Known Member

    boots is the drink that stirs the straw.

    this is not good news.

    i think newsrooms are trying to adjust to the changes but advertising folks are running around with their asses up their heads.
     
  9. boots

    boots New Member

    Ace, this is so freightening. I had a kid ask me about becoming a journalist and I honestly had to tell him that he'd better have something to fall back on. 20, 30 years ago, I wouldn't have been this bleak abou the business.
     
  10. Ace

    Ace Well-Known Member

    Hell, I'm just hoping to hang on.

    Youngsters ask about the business and I don't know what to say. We will always need writers and editors, but I don't know what they will be writing and editing.
     
  11. Oz

    Oz Active Member

    Stay classy, boots.
     
  12. Riddick

    Riddick Active Member

    I really don't think it's that bleak. Plus, I prefer to think that solid journalists will always find jobs. We all know there are too many hacks out there.
    I feel bad for everyone that's losing their job, I went through it myself, but I'm optimistic this is more like trimming the fat than throwing out the steak entirely.
    I really don't think it's that bleak. Plus, I prefer to think that solid journalists will always find jobs. We all know there are too many hacks out there.
    I feel bad for everyone that's losing their job, I went through it myself, but I'm optimistic this is more like trimming the fat than throwing out the steak entirely.
     
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