Author Topic: Podcast in two different locations  (Read 2612 times)

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Offline Simon

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Podcast in two different locations
« on: February 06, 2011, 02:48:53 AM »
What's the best way to record a podcast with two people in different locations?

Offline Piotr Rasputin

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Re: Podcast in two different locations
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2011, 07:53:39 PM »
Skype.

Audacity.
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Offline crimsonace

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Re: Podcast in two different locations
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2011, 06:42:28 PM »
Skype.

Audacity.

This.

I did something on Skype a few weeks back and was really impressed with the way four different people were able to sound like they were in the same room despite being in different states.

I use Audacity to record everything, and you can use a few plug-ins to make the thing really sound good and professional. If you learn how to use Audacity and all of the tricks therein (I use the noise reducer and compressor/limiter functions quite liberally), you can produce a pretty good broadcast.

Offline sportsnut

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Re: Podcast in two different locations
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2011, 10:58:06 PM »
Skype.

Audacity.

I agree 100 percent and I  have used Google talk but I have not figured out how to add more then one caller yet.

This.

I did something on Skype a few weeks back and was really impressed with the way four different people were able to sound like they were in the same room despite being in different states.

I use Audacity to record everything, and you can use a few plug-ins to make the thing really sound good and professional. If you learn how to use Audacity and all of the tricks therein (I use the noise reducer and compressor/limiter functions quite liberally), you can produce a pretty good broadcast.